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LNK2001 and LNK1120 when compiling a x64 dynamic library linking a x86 static library
You can not - in other words, there is NO WAY to - link a 32-bit library with a 64-bit executable or DLL (or a 32-bit executable to a 64-bit DLL or vice versa). You will either have to compile your .DLL/.EXE as 32-bit, or find a 64-bit version of the 32-bit library. No other solution! The 64-bit architecture is different from the 32-bit architecture in several aspects, but most importantly, the addresses (pointers) are 64-bit in a 64-bit architecture, which prevents almost any 32-bit code from working correctly in a 64-bit environment (because the upper 32 bits of the addresses are lost, which doesn't produce anything meaningful).

Categories : C++

Linking a library which is compile time linked to another library
dlopen() will return success, if the lib is already linked in. Because library1.so has to use library2.so, you need to link both of them to binary1. (-llibrary1 -llibrary2) From your question seems, that library2.so links in libas_sdk.so runtime. It happens probably when you call its some init_library2() or some function with some configuration data. I think the problem is not with your linking, but with your binary1. This initialization of library2 (or library1) is what you do too early, or too late. IMHO your binary1 should be linked with a simple -llibrary1 -llibrary2 .

Categories : C++

Statically linking a C library with a Haskell library
To solve this problem I had to: re-link the Haskell library with the C bindings' object files and use the ghc-options tag in my Cabal file to make sure they linked in the right order. All the changes are in the test project (http://github.com/deech/CPlusPlusBindings). Below the process of creating a new archive that includes both the C and Haskell objects is explained in detail and it is not simple. The complexity occurs because there is no way (as of Cabal 1.16.0.2) to hook into the linker part of the build process. Setting the flags in the Cabal file is trivial so it is not described here. Relinking The Haskell Library Set the build type to custom by adding: build-type: custom to the cabal file. Insert customized build logic by replacing the main method in Setup.hs with: ma

Categories : C++

Linking D library to C++ code
It is generally easier to let the D compiler do the linking: g++ -c yourfile.cpp dmd yourfile.o d_file.d You might have to add curl to it as well, same as you did before. To pass a linker argument through dmd (or gdmd if you're using gdc, should work the same way), pass -Larg dmd yourfile.o d_file.d -L-lstdc++ -L-lcurl -L-lQtGui # and so on It is generally easier to put main() in D too (it can just immediately call out to a C++ defined function too) because otherwise you'll probably have to initialize the D runtime before using it from C++. But to finish the process you've started... first thing, looks like your liblife.a has the same file added twice. I'd try deleting that file and recreating it, or just skipping that step and passing the .o files to the linker directly without

Categories : C++

Makefile: Linking .*a library
From your makefile, I'm guessing you have these source files: minishell.c entrada_minishell.c ejecutar.c And that you want to compile them, and then link them all together with libshell.a to create an executable called microshell. In that case, you want something like: CC=gcc CFLAGS=-Wall -pedantic all: microshell microshell: minishell.o entrada_minishell.o ejecutar.o $(CC) -o $@ $^ -L. -lshell You can add a clean target if you want, but just that should get you going. Editorial notes: it's really weird to put header files on the compilation line; I assumed you didn't actually want to do that. You should look into gcc's -MMD flag to do automatic dependency generation.

Categories : C

Clojure (JVM): Linking (referencing) a library
In JVM land there is no linker. The JVM handles loading and linking. Everything in Java | Clojure is a shared object, so dead code elimination isn't possible. You never know what is going to get used by the code that loads yours. In clojure every function gets its own .class file(smallest 'binary' file on the JVM). These get zipped into a JAR file which is the standard unit of distribution(this is about equivalent of a .dll or .so). So only the functions you use will get loaded. However if you are worried about distribution size then you are out of luck or have to manually rip apart JAR files to find the right class files.

Categories : Clojure

Linking non C99 static library in C99 mode
The order of the command line arguments matter. The way you have it now, the linker goes through your static libraries, realizes that nothing so far need anything it provides, and throw away everything in it. Do this: gcc -std=c99 -g -I../ -Llib/ test.c ../file1.c ../file2.c -lmylib -o test

Categories : C

C++ - Linking Error Using AMD Source Library
As in the comment, adding the -I /opt/clAmdFft-1.10.321/include to the CFLAGS= -I /usr/local/cuda/include -g is my preferred way to solve this particular problem. As to how to use C_INCLUDE_PATH, technically your usage is correct - except you are not compiling the code with gcc but with g++ and thus you should use CPLUS_INCLUDE_PATH. Here's a compile-example (not showing my xemacs session creating testing.cpp and testing.h - testing.cpp simply doing #include <testing.h> (which contains a simple define that I'm printing). $ mkdir ../testing $ export C_INCLUDE_PATH=../testing $ g++ -Wall testing.cpp testing.cpp:2:21: fatal error: testing.h: No such file or directory compilation terminated. $ export CPLUS_INCLUDE_PATH=../testing $ g++ -Wall testing.cpp However, the whole point

Categories : C++

cmake library linking order
Just link lib_B and lib_C to libD, it's worth the effort (I can tell by experience), otherwise you will have big troubles, for example if you try to install your program. lib_C and lib_D should have all their symbols solved when you are finished creating their library files, before linking them to any other library. By the way, you can compact your target_link_libraries in one line per target, like: TARGET_LINK_LIBRARIES(exec lib_A lib_D) And, if exec doesn't depend directly on lib_D, you can avoid linking it if you have correctly linked lib_A to lib_D. Anyway, regarding Q1: even if the order is guaranteed by CMake, it is not guaranteed the way your linker will treat it, you are going to suffer pain if you rely on that

Categories : Gcc

How to force linking of a symbol from a particular library?
After loooong fight (and search) I found a solution here. To summarize: I needed two symbols. In my source code I put something like this: __asm__(".symver symbol1, symbol1@SOMELIB_1.0"); void symbol1(void) { ..... } __asm__(".symver symbol2, symbol2@SOMELIB_1.0"); void symbol2(void) { ..... } Then I needed a liker script mylib.map containing: SOMELIB_1.0 { symbol1; symbol2; }; To link "mylib.so" I needed to pass additional argument: -Wl,--version-script=mylib.map

Categories : Linux

Linking the Google API iOS Static Library
Embarrassing that I didnt actually google part of the error code. Anyway seems I didnt include Security.framework and SystemConfiguration.framework. Ill probably need the other two they suggest sometime later too. Source: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/gtm-oauth2/TVgSxG3129A/xcfsF9gmkgIJ

Categories : IOS

Boost library eclipse linking error
Just a wild guess but try omitting the lib from the library name to see if it can find the library that way. Otherwise, clearly the library cannot be found in your library path.

Categories : C++

Strip names after linking a static library
No, you can't. A static library is simply a collection of object files and the object files within the static library have no special privileges over those using the static library. You can obviously strip the final binary. If you must hide symbols then they need to be static, which forces you to use fewer implementations files to allow the symbol to be shared, which is inconvenient.

Categories : IOS

Error linking test-suite to library
Cabal is conflicted over two locations for the "Lexical.Token" module. Confusingly, they're both the same file. It's resolving mylib-0.0.0.1 from your build-depends to the "locally installed and registered" version of mylib. It's resolving Lexical.Token in the source as an other-modules entry, something that should be exposed through your test suite. Fix it be removing Lexical.Token from other-modules, I imagine. Your test suite should not share code with your tested code, but instead import all the modules as if your tested code were an external library.

Categories : Haskell

Linking error when trying to use self-written Framework in Library of an App
The short answer is no, you can't link the framework statically into your .a file. See this discussion. The reason is, the static library doesn't include the object code (the definition) of classes from the dynamic framework. The static library links to object code in the framework the same way the app links to the framework code: at run-time. From Apple's Framework Programming Guide: "Dynamic shared libraries have characteristics that set them apart from static linked shared libraries. For static linked shared libraries, the symbols in the library are checked at link time to make sure they exist. If they don’t exist, link errors occur. With dynamic shared libraries, the binding of undefined symbols is delayed until the execution of the program." It depends on what you want to be ab

Categories : Objective C

Makefile Linking with shared library fails
The traditional behaviour of linkers is to search for external functions from left to right in the libraries specified on the command line. This means that a library containing the definition of a function should appear after any source files or object files which use it.

Categories : C++

Linking protocol buffers library in XCode
First of all, you need to compile the Protocol Buffers static libraries using their makefiles, and then, link in the static libraries into your project. You should not be pulling in their source code into your Xcode project. When linking the libraries into my project, I had the same 'undefined symbols' errors as you. Based on comment #19 in this discussion, running the following commands when building the Protocol Buffers libraries will make them go away. $ ./configure CC=clang CXX="clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++" CXXFLAGS="-O3" --disable-shared $ make

Categories : Xcode

Static library GNUSTEP and correct linking
The libraries in /usr/local/lib and other system 'lib' directories will be dynamic. They can't be used as static (AFAIK), and finding them wouldn't really help. I'm no expert with GNUstep, but it sounds like you are missing the Objective-C runtime. You will need to download the source code of the GNUstep libraries and frameworks, and then compile them into static libraries yourself. Really, wrapping all of those frameworks into your application will just add unnecessary work for both you and your end users. Dynamic libraries exist for a purpose. There's no reason to have multiple copies of the same code on the filesystem. Just require GNUstep as a dependency. Although its a slight pain for the users, they only need to do it once, and with most distros, installation is only a command or

Categories : Objective C

Linking against a debug version of a library with CMake
You should not rename the file manually. Use CMake's CMAKE_DEBUG_POSTFIX variable or the DEBUG_POSTFIX target property instead: add_library(myLib SHARED ${SOURCES}) set_target_properties(mylib PROPERTIES DEBUG_POSTFIX "d") [...] add_executable(myApp WIN32 ${SOURCES}) target_link_libraries(myApp myLib)

Categories : C++

Library linking in Visual Studio Professional 2010
You're not linking the windows sockets import lib. Their library won't pull it in for you. It needs to be added to your linker-dependencies as well. It looks like their library is actually a static lib that expects your program to be linked as a MT DLL. Add ws2_32.lib to your library list on your linker settings configuration (where you added your 3rd-party library).

Categories : C++

Cython build problems when linking against library under linux
The problem is that GCC cannot statically link a shared library if any of the static dependencies weren't build with -fPIC. Here, NetworKit is build without -fPIC, so you either need to rebuild the static NetworKit-Core-0 using -fPIC or link it dynamically.

Categories : C++

Confused about .so version and linking strategy when distributing a api library
Yes, the program can link to newer libraries with a compatible interface. The numbers in the filename encode the library Application Binary Interface (ABI). FreeBSD's handbook has more information about library versioning. The basic rules are: Start from 1.0 If there is a change that is backwards compatible, bump minor number (note that ELF systems ignore the minor number) If there is an incompatible change, bump major number The linker will sort out the details to use the newest library version with a compatible interface. There is also more information available here on stackoverflow.

Categories : C++

Error when linking with POCO library compiled with i686-w64-mingw32
Usually errors like this are threw only when you have not linked your library properly. Are you sure thatlibPocoFoundationmtd.a contains this function? And if you do, what warnings are shown when you compiled those libraries. Check these too Make sure you defined all needed preprocessor symbols! (-D) eg: POCO_STATIC

Categories : C++

Dynamic linking error with statically linked boost library
Sorry, this question is asked by myself, and finally I figured out the reason, and I pasted the solution in the Edit section of the question. But @TobiMcNamobi suggests to give this question an answer even it is asked by myself. So I paste the answer here: I mixed up CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS_RELEASE with CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS, the former has a /MD option, but the latter does not. In fact cmake will pass the latter to compiler, so my program is actually linked statically as the error output shows. Solution: run cmake with -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release when generating makefile, this will add options of CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS_RELEASE into CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS automatically, then the program will be linked to CRT dynamically.

Categories : C++

Qt5.1.0 Static linking, "This application cannot be statically linked to the fftreal library"
It failed trying to build one of the examples. Try adding -nomake expamples to your configure line. Also. I don't think the open source license allows you to build static linked libraries.

Categories : Qt

Linking cross-platform library to native android application
You should use the $(TARGET_ARCH_ABI) flag, for example: include $(CLEAR_VARS) LOCAL_MODULE := mylib-prebuilt LOCAL_SRC_FILES := ../path_to_prebuilt_folder/libs/$(TARGET_ARCH_ABI)/libmylib.so include $(PREBUILT_SHARED_LIBRARY)

Categories : Android

cuda shared library linking: undefined reference to cudaRegisterLinkedBinary
Here's an example linux shared object creation along the lines you indicated: create a shared library containing my CUDA kernels that has a CUDA-free wrapper/header. create a test executable for the shared library. First the shared library. The build commands for this are as follows: nvcc -arch=sm_20 -Xcompiler '-fPIC' -dc test1.cu test2.cu nvcc -arch=sm_20 -Xcompiler '-fPIC' -dlink test1.o test2.o -o link.o g++ -shared -o test.so test1.o test2.o link.o -L/usr/local/cuda/lib64 -lcudart It seems you may be missing the second step above in your makefile, but I haven't analyzed if there are any other issues with your makefile. Now, for the test executable, the build commands are as follows: g++ -c main.cpp g++ -o testmain main.o test.so To run it, simply execute the testmain execu

Categories : C++

How to provide linker options when linking a static library with qmake?
In staticlib projects, the LFLAGS are not passed to the linker. In fact, there's no documented way to pass such flags. The solution is generator-dependent. For msvc_nmake, LIBFLAGS are passed to the linker instead. To get verbose output, you might add QMAKE_LIBFLAGS += /VERBOSE To verify that it works, on any system, you can invoke qmake -spec win32-msvc2008; the particular msvc version doesn't matter. For unixmake, AR is used to invoke the linker, so you have to add the flags to QMAKE_AR. To get verbose output, you might add QMAKE_AR += -v To verify, invoke qmake -spec macx-llvm; any other unix spec should work as well.

Categories : Qt

__attribute__((used)) has no effect when linking static library into shared object (android gcc 4.8)
If you are using the NDK make files, you might try LOCAL_WHOLE_STATIC_LIBRARIES when you link instead of LOCAL_STATIC_LIBRARIES into the host library or executable. This will avoid stripping anything from the static library. Though it doesn't have much granularity...

Categories : Android

Linker doesn't use a default runtime library when linking together libraries only (no objects)
It turns out that the linker isn't clever enough to figure out what default runtime library is needed for the executable if only static libraries are given to link, with no discrete object files. This can be corroborated by asking the linker to be verbose in the .pro file: win32-msvc*: QMAKE_LFLAGS += /VERBOSE /VERBOSE:LIB /VERBOSE:REF When the dummy file is present in the application project, the linker lists the following default libraries: Processed /DEFAULTLIB:msvcprt Processed /DEFAULTLIB:MSVCRT Processed /DEFAULTLIB:OLDNAMES Processed /DEFAULTLIB:uuid.lib Without the dummy file, no default libraries are chosen by the linker at all. It is then unable to find the entry point, since the C runtime is not linked in. Adding the relevant C runtime library is sufficient to link the ap

Categories : Misc

gmp library on windows - linking error LNK2001 unresolved external symbol operator <<
You're missing the gmpxx library when linking with VS2012. You probably remembered to include the gmp library in your VS library list. Put gmpxx there as well and you'll be fine.

Categories : C++

Detect unresolved symbols when linking my own static library due to forgotten source files
As mentioned by @PeteBecker in the comments, this is about testing. Create an executable that uses the static library and as long as it uses all the features you will catch missing objects very quickly, during link. Make this executable test all the features and it doubles as your unit test facility as well.

Categories : C++

does new versions of xcode support cross-project references for adding static library for linking?
Let me first explain roughly what are .a files and frameworks. In Cocoa you write your classes in into .m files, more or less on class per file. When you compile your project the compiler processes each of your .m files one by one and generates the binary representation (machine code) of your source code together with some header information like the list and offset of the methods of the object. The result is one .o object file for each .m source code file. Now if you are linking for a static library, all of these object files are packed into an .a archive file for a given platform: i386 for simulator, armv7 and armv7s for device. To use these archives you also need to public header files of the SDK (even if it is possible to extract the same information from the archives). A .framework b

Categories : Iphone

Linking to static library consisting of several libraries and object files using a single header file
Looks to me that your include files may have references to other include files. So, you will need to provide a flag to indicate the location of those include files. I'll suggest providing the location (directory containing all include files) as INCL_DIR=/include/dir/location and including it in the compilation phase using the -I flag. For example, your rule for api.o will become api.o: api.c api.h gcc -c $(CFLAGS) -I$(INCL_DIR) $(INCLUDES_FOR_BUNCH_OF_LIBS) $< -o $@

Categories : C

XCode linking error to cached library information without being called (Undefined symbols for architecture)
I resolved my own problem, or rather, the issue was with the black box of a library that I was including. From the command line performed the following command in a terminal window: grep SampleMarkView myLib.a Which resulted in: Binary File:myLib.a matches I talked to the person who created the library and they sent me an updated version that didn't cause the problem - I guess they had old references in their code. So at the very least I hope this post provides a list of various things to try if you are having a library referencing problem!

Categories : IOS

compiling c code after linking pro C library generates linker error: undefined reference to function sqlcxt
This one was really bad for me (HOURS of searching over 3 days). Ends up that you need to tell PROC*C that the code is going to be CPP so PRO*C will put the extern "C" on the code itself. PCCFLAGS=ireclen=132 oreclen=132 select_error=no DBMS=V8 userid=dwqs999/workque@dev127.uprr.com sqlcheck=full mode=ANSI code=CPP lines=yes cpp_suffix=cpp

Categories : Gcc

Linking a static boost build into a static library under VS2012 & Win32/64
This is by design. When building a static library, any dependencies to that library will not get linked into the library directly. Instead when building an executable all library dependencies (direct and indirect) will be linked directly to that executable. This is also the way most compiler handle static libraries. While VS does offer a special option to link dependencies into static libs, this is not possible on e.g. gcc without resorting to dirty file hacks. Since CMake only supports features that can be used on all supported generators, CMake will not allow to do this even on VS builds. You have a couple of options now: Use a dll instead of a static library (add_library(${libname} SHARED ...)). While a static library is basically a bunch of object files wrapped together, a dll is

Categories : Visual Studio

Shell Extensions: Static-Linking vs. Dynamic-Linking of C/C++ Run-Time DLLs
The short answer to this question is "it depends". But that's probably how far you got already. However, it really becomes a choice of "the lesser of two evils", and to a large degree it depends on what your extension is doing. If you build it static, how large is it, compared to non-static? If there isn't much of a difference, then you are obviously not using a huge amount of DLL code anyways, which would be fine. If you find your extension grows from a few dozen kilobytes to several megabytes, then you have to ponder whether it's better to ask the clients to download the redist-package, or include it as part of your installation. There is no one answer that is always right. It's a compromise, and you have to judge which makes most sense for you (and for your clients) - easy install

Categories : C++

Why does Implicit DLL Linking need relevant Lib file but Explicit Linking does not?
Why Implicitly linking need Lib file too. The .libs have the import information of the dll, you can check the information using the dumpbin command that is included in Windows/Visual Studio SDK. This is the link information of recv inside ws2_32.lib for example: Version : 0 Machine : 14C (x86) TimeDateStamp: 4907F6ED Wed Oct 29 01:38:53 2008 SizeOfData : 00000014 DLL name : WS2_32.dll Symbol name : _recv@16 Type : code Name type : ordinal Ordinal : 16 You can check there is the ordinal and the name inside ws2_32.dll (check that now it says to import a DLL). What information it need to retrieve from 'Lib' file that cannot get from DLL or Header file In the header file, there is no information from where to extract the imports, so them are mark

Categories : C++

Linking errors on Linux gcc 4.3.4: "undefined reference" related to "jpeg" library (e.g., undefined reference to `jpeg_std_error(jpeg_error_mgr*)')
Following up on the comments: are you sure you installed libjpeg? Run find $HOME -iname libjpeg*so* to find the libjpeg you need to link to. This command will most likely yield several results. You can simply take the first line of this output and append it to your compilation command, but leave out the "-ljpeg" suggested above. If it does not give any output at all, you don't have libjpeg installed in your home. So either install libjpeg disable the part of the code that needs it if you don't need it either extend your search, like find /usr /opt -iname libjpeg*so* ... and try with one of the libjpeg installations on the system. EDIT (after libjpeg was found on the system): Try appending /usr/lib/libjpeg.so.62 to the compile command (the OPTIONS variable in your Makefile

Categories : C++



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