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DateTime.TryParseExact does not process long format strings
Because with TryParseExact, the spacing of the date is important. It's a bit hacky, but if no better solution is presented, I would do a TryParseExact using 'ddd MMM d HH:mm:ss yyyy' and if that fails, another TryParseExact using 'ddd MMM d HH:mm:ss yyyy' (with the two spaces) Edit I think I found a smarter way, pass DateTimeStyles.AllowInnerWhite to the TryParseExact method. According to the docs: Extra white-space characters in the middle of the string must be ignored during parsing, except if they occur in the DateTimeFormatInfo format patterns. Not sure what it means by "except if they occur in the DateTimeFormatInfo format patterns." but it is worth a try.

Categories : Asp Net

Test convert string to date time other than DateTime.TryParseExact
Your first code if (DateTime.TryParseExact()) { //do something } does exactly what you want. Use it like this: if (DateTime.TryParseExact(str, ...)) { // OR use DateTime.TryParse() // str is a valid DateTime } else { // str is not valid } You may use DateTime.TryParse() if you don't want to provide a format. Both methods returns a boolean value.

Categories : C#

How to use culture for changing the datetime format
First, you don't need to actually change the culture if you want to parse or convert dates with a given CultureInfo, so this is unnecessary: Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = ci; You can simply use the DateTime.Parse overload that accepts the culture: DateTime dt = DateTime.Parse(fromdate, ci); The exception is probably raised at Convert.ToDateTime("d",ci); since d is not a valid date ;) Maybe FROM_DATE is a string property and you actually want to convert the datetime to a short-date-string, then you could either use: _DivAPath.FROM_DATE = dt.ToString("d", ci); or _DivAPath.FROM_DATE = dt.ToShortDateString(); // uses the current-culture

Categories : Asp Net

DateTime format culture - how to change it?
I had quite the same problem, as I'm from Romania. Here's my solution: Views/Shared/DisplayTemplates/Date.cshtml (create folders and file if not existing) @model Nullable<DateTime> @{ DateTime dt = DateTime.Now; if (Model != null) { dt = (System.DateTime)Model; } @dt.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy", System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); } Basically, whenever you're using Html.Display or Html.DisplayFor for a DateTime (nullable, in my example), it will be rendered according to this template. You can also set up an editor template (where I use jquery ui's DatePicker). You can read more about MVC templates here Script referenced in Layout.cs (therefore available in all views) $.validator.methods.number = function (value, element) { value = floatVal

Categories : C#

Parsing a date time in november using bg-BG culture and dd-MMM-yyyy format.
Running this code: var culture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("bg-BG"); foreach (var name in culture.DateTimeFormat.AbbreviatedMonthNames) Debug.WriteLine(name); Gives these month name abbreviations: яну фев мар апр май юни юли авг сеп окт ное дек It would seem that .Net has the abbreviation for November in Bulgarian to be "ное", not the "Нов" string in your input. I don't speak Bulgarian, but Google Translate accepts "ное" as "November", but "Нов" is translated to English as "new". So my guess is that the source data is incorrect. The best solution is to never transmit dates as localized strings between client and server. Instead, use an ISO8601 format, such as 2013-11-15T15:20:39.

Categories : C#

How to solve System.DateTime does not contain a definition for TryParseExact" on Windows CE and C#
Checkout this explanation, it shows how to make your own tryparse, because compact framework does not have it's own. http://www.yortondotnet.com/2009/11/tryparse-for-compact-framework.html

Categories : C#

Parsing Custom DateTime Format
The problem is that the date-time format you specified uses hh for a 12-hour time format, but the input string has 15 in that area. It can't parse this because 15 is outside the expected range. Try using HH for a 24-hour time format instead: string x = "20130722153523"; DateTime y = DateTime.ParseExact(x, "yyyyMMddHHmmss", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); Further Reading: Custom Date and Time Format Strings

Categories : C#

format string in datetime c# to insert in MYSQL datetime column
Your line: string time = Convert.ToDateTime("10-10-2014 15:00:00"); Shouldn't compile. I can only guess that you don't have DateTime as type of your column in SQL Server, you should modify it to keep DateTime and then pass a DateTime type object, not a string.

Categories : C#

Datetime parsing throw Format Exception error
When using DateTime.Parse(), if you want it to parse dates using a format other than the culture the program is running under, you need to specify an IFormatProvider as the second argument to specify which incoming date format you are expecting. Example: cmd.Parameters.Add("@createdon", SqlDbType.DateTime).Value = DateTime.Parse(createdon, new CultureInfo("en-US", true)); This will parse dates in dd/MM/yyyy format, the default format for the US.

Categories : C#

Parsing a datetime string with timezone in PHP
420 is zone in minutes. 420/60 = 7 I want to parse it so that I can, for example, say what day of the week it is. If you want to know what day of the week it is, you have many options. For example you can use date and mktime-functions: $parsed = date_parse("2013-07-31T19:20:30.45-07:00"); $unix_timestamp = mktime($parsed['hour'], 0, 0, $parsed['month'], $parsed['day'], $parsed['year'], (int)$parsed['is_dst']); echo date('l', $unix_timestamp); So you want to show the information about timezone? You can get the time zone name by using timezone_name_from_abbr function: $name = timezone_name_from_abbr("", -1*$parsed['zone']*60, false); // NB: Offset in seconds! var_dump($name); $timezone = new DateTimezone($name); var_dump($timezone);

Categories : PHP

input string not in correct format...when converting a string to datetime...error?
Make sure your input string is using decimal point symbol for your current culture!. If your input string does not match these rules, decimal.Parse throws the Input string was not in a correct format exception If you for instance use the invariant culture: decimal.Parse("17.5", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) The dot will be the accepted decimal point. You can read more about it over at MSDN There they also mention that the decimal.TryParse method is better suited for invariant culture parsing Also (obviously), make sure your input string is not null, empty, or containing any non-numerical characters (except for the one, optional, dot or comma, depending on your culture)

Categories : C#

Finding a Culture with the same Language
Resources that are specific to a language, but not to a specific culture, should be in their own file, e.g. if you have the following resource files: Resources.resx Resources.en.resx Resources.fr.resx Resources.fr-FR.resx (language-invariant strings in Resources.resx, French strings in Resources.fr.resx, and France-specific French strings in Resources.fr-FR.resx) And the user's culture is fr-CA (Canadian French), then it will use resources from the following files, in this order: Resources.fr.resx Resources.resx This is the default resource behavior.

Categories : C#

Parsing string "10:00AM" to DateTime Type?
Your access layer for the database should support the Ruby DateTime type, hence you can parse it as follows: require 'date' DateTime.parse("10:00AM") # => #<DateTime: 2013-08-11T10:00:00+00:00 ((2456516j,36000s,0n),+0s,2299161j)> The whole meridiem notation (AM/PM) is at the presentation level. Your database will store it in its DateTime structure and everytime your retrieve it back into Rails, you can get your presentation by using strftime your_date.strftime("%I:%M%p") => "10:00AM"

Categories : Ruby On Rails

culture for datetime in c#
Use DateTime.TryParseExact: if (DateTime.TryParseExact(dsVchRecord.Tables[0].Rows[0]["Date"].ToString(), "MM/dd/yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out _dtVoucherDate)) //the rest of it

Categories : C#

Is there a way to find the first string that matches a DateTime format string?
I'm not aware of anything other than DateTime.TryParse (or alternately, a RegEx) for doing this in .NET. I would set up a stream tokenizer, passing only candidate token pairs into DateTime.TryParse (based on some combination of minimum string length, an maybe substring checks for a pair of dashes on token 0 and a pair of colons on token 1, etc. Exact checks would depend on how many date/time formats you're supporting)

Categories : C#

DateTime.TryParse for any culture
Sorry, but it seems impossible, since datetime could be ambiguous, and that's why misinterpreted e.g. "01/02/03" is 01 Feb 2003 (Russia) 02 Jan 2003 (USA) 03 Feb 2001 (China) see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_format_by_country

Categories : C#

Parsing a string into a DateTime object and adding minutes in Ruby
what about? as long as you're using activesupport of course text_t = "1:00 PM ET" text_next = DateTime.strptime(text_t, '%I:%M %p %Z') text_next = text_next + 30.minutes

Categories : Ruby

C# DateTime format with input from a string
A DateTime has no format. It just represents a date and a time. If you want to display it in a specific format, convert it back to a string with the appropriate format specifiers: string format = "yyyy.MM.dd HH:mm:ss:ffff"; string eventdatetime = "2013.07.12 15:32:04:4687"; DateTime x = DateTime.ParseExact(eventdatetime, format, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); var display = x.ToString("yyyy.MM.dd HH:mm:ss:ffff"); Furthermore, zzzz designates the timezone. You want ffff which designates fractions of a second.

Categories : C#

Datetime string format alignment
datetime.datetime has format method. You need to convert it str. >>> '{:%Y/%m/%d}'.format(dt) '2013/06/26' >>> '{:>20}'.format(dt) '>20' >>> '{:>20}'.format(str(dt)) ' 2013-06-26 09:00:00' >>> import datetime >>> dt = datetime.datetime(2013, 6, 26, 9, 0) >>> l = [dt, dt] >>> template = "{0:>25} {1:>25}" >>> print template.format(*l) >25 >25 >>> print template.format(*map(str, l)) 2013-06-26 09:00:00 2013-06-26 09:00:00

Categories : Python

Convert string to DateTime and format
See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.parse.aspx public class Example { public static void Main() { string[] dateStrings = {"2008-05-01T07:34:42-5:00", "2008-05-01 7:34:42Z", "Thu, 01 May 2008 07:34:42 GMT"}; foreach (string dateString in dateStrings) { DateTime convertedDate = DateTime.Parse(dateString); Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1} time {2}", dateString, convertedDate.Kind.ToString(), convertedDate); } } }

Categories : C#

Base View Model with Culture/Language via BeginExecuteCore
Ok. I've finally solved this. I'm, creating a base model that all of my other view-models are going to inherit from. It can also be called directly in case any view doesn't require its own view-model. public class ViewModelBase { public UserSettings ProfileSettings; // Create a new instance, so we don't need to every time its called. public ViewModelBase() { ProfileSettings = new UserSettings(); } } public class UserSettings // UserSettings is only used here and consumed by ViewModelBase, its the name there that is used throughout the application { public string BrandName { get; set; } public UserRegistrationInformation UserSession; } This is being generated in the basecontroller. public abstract class BaseController : Controller { publ

Categories : Asp Net Mvc

Download a file on the basis of language (Current Culture)
If the filename format will stay same you could do this string cultureCode = "en-US"; //set current locale Uri reportUri = new Uri(String.Format("http://www.xyz.com/report/report.{0}.htm", cultureCode), UriKind.Absolute); That way it'll dynamically create the URI for you with the relevant locale added. As a quick method public void Uri GetLocalReportUri(string cultureCode) { return new Uri(String.Format("http://www.xyz.com/report/report.{0}.htm", cultureCode), UriKind.Absolute); }

Categories : C#

Why is it so slow DateTime.TryParse with culture US and AdjustToUniversal
It's because you're creating 4059 objects - specifically in the bit that says new CultureInfo("en-US"). Declare the US CultureInfo object outside of the loop.

Categories : C#

Culture conversion of datetime in javascript/jquery
Working with dates in JavaScript without a helper library is very painful and error prone. Have you tried using Moment.js? It has support for many languages including French (Canada).

Categories : C#

Input string was not in a correct format with DateTime
you should always use DateTime.TryParseExact. string[] formats = { "dddd, dd MMMM yyyy" }; //your format here DateTime dt; if (DateTime.TryParseExact(dpLeaveFromStd.SelectedDate.GetValueOrDefault(), formats, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out dt)) { }

Categories : C#

Culture variant DaylightName and StandardName (DateTime formatting)
Thanks to Hans Passant for this answer. Time zone names are stored in the registry, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionTime Zones key. You'd need a localized version of Windows to see something different.

Categories : C#

In SQL Server, convert 'mmmm dd,yyy' string to datetime format
While it's not recommended to store your date in string formats, you still could properly convert string to date. When you know exact format, avoid using cast and use convert - see possible formats here. set language english select convert(datetime, 'June 01, 2013', 107) ----------------------- 2013-06-01 00:00:00.000 Conversion from and to 107 format depends on your connection settings. If, for example, your connection language is not english, you could get an error set language norwegian select convert(datetime, 'June 01, 2013', 107) ----------------------- Msg 241, Level 16, State 1, Line 2 Conversion failed when converting date and/or time from character string.

Categories : SQL

DateTime format using t-sql string functions in SQL Server query
Well, convert(varchar(25), getdate(), 120) returns: 1 1234567890123456789 2013-08-08 01:43:49 So change: substring(..., 6, 11) To: substring(..., 3, 14) And you'll get: 13-08-08 01:43

Categories : Sql Server

foreign culture XML text parsing
Seems more an input XML file problem to me. Check if it contains this 'invalid' character ('İ' (0x0130) ) and correct it if necessary. If you wrote the input XML using your app/game, check if you are writing the contents using InvariantCulture as well. Br,

Categories : C#

Parsing a string in clock format into int
Try this: Timer t=new Timer(); t.schedule(new TimerTask() { @Override public void run() { final Date d = new Date(); runOnUiThread(new Runnable() { @Override public void run() { textView.setText(d.getMinutes() +":" + d.getSeconds()); } }); } }, 0,1000);

Categories : Java

How to get the string value of xml format after parsing by the xml parser
If you want to parse XML data, look into XMLDictionary. This is an easier way to parse the information and even easier to get at it. It is an easy framework that easily parses your data into a neat and ordered hierarchy of NSDictionaries and NSArrays and all the data will appear as NSStrings. https://github.com/nicklockwood/XMLDictionary

Categories : IOS

How do I convert string date format to datetime date format?
This should do it: SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, REPLACE('Sept. 23, 2013','.',''), 107) This removes dot in string and converts to datetime format 107. And this returns the string you wanted (MM/DD/YYYY): SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), CONVERT(DATETIME, REPLACE('Sept. 23, 2013','.',''), 107), 101) For other format types see: http://www.sqlusa.com/bestpractices/datetimeconversion/ and http://www.sql-server-helper.com/tips/date-formats.aspx Edit: It turns out it works for me because of Slovenian locale (Sept.). This one should work in English locale: SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), CONVERT(DATETIME, SUBSTRING('Sept. 23, 2013', 0, 4) + ' ' + SUBSTRING('Sept. 23, 2013',6,9), 107), 101) As a function.

Categories : Asp Net

Datetime Formatting giving it a specific culture doesn't change how day is printed out
You are a victim of Composite Formatting overload for Console.WriteLine where you could pass Format string and a series of object to be inserted in the placeholders of the format string You need to write in this way Console.WriteLine(date.ToString("dddd MM-dd-yy",usCultureInfo)); and you get the right day text. See the specs here DateTime.ToString(format, IFormatProvider)

Categories : C#

convert DateTime to string according to customCultureInfo in G((combination of date and Time) format
try this: DateTime date1 = new DateTime(2008, 4, 10, 6, 30, 0); Console.WriteLine(date1.ToString("G", DateTimeFormatInfo.InvariantInfo)); // Displays 04/10/2008 06:30:00 Console.WriteLine(date1.ToString("G", CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("en-us"))); // Displays 4/10/2008 6:30:00 AM Console.WriteLine(date1.ToString("G", CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("nl-BE")));

Categories : C#

Error : String was not recognized as a valid DateTime while converting to date format in c#
Your date string needs to be this: Thu Jul 18 2013 17:39:53 +0000 Whatever is producing your string needs to have the year value after the month and day and before the time, like above. string date = "Thu Jul 18 2013 17:39:53 +0000"; var theDate = Convert.ToDateTime(date); Note: This will produce a valid .NET DateTime object. UPDATE: If you cannot change the string produced, then use the ParseExact method with a custom format, like this: string date = "Thu Jul 18 17:39:53 +0000 2013"; var theDate = DateTime.ParseExact(date, "ddd MMM dd H:mm:ss zzz yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

Categories : C#

how to convert blob string format to image in xml parsing
I expect your BLOB is Base64 encoded. In that case you can use this Nick Lockwood's category to decode Base64 string to NSData https://github.com/nicklockwood/Base64 and create UIImage from NSData. Example code: NSData *imageData = [NSData dataWithBase64EncodedString:blobString]; UIImage *image = [UIImage imageWithData:imageData];

Categories : Iphone

Covert c# datetime format to java datetime format
Your format string doesn't match the input date string : // 2013-07-03T19:16:02.3694 <-- date string static SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd"); You need to first parse the date string using the SimpleDateFormat with pattern yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSSSS and then you can format the Date object with dd-MM-YYYY pattern.Remember MM is for months , mm stands for minutes. String formattedDate = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-YYYY").format( new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSSSS") .parse(reportItem.getString("AddedTime")));

Categories : C#

number format based on user culture php
check the return value of setlocale(LC_NUMERIC, "en-US"); $val = setlocale(LC_NUMERIC, "en-US"); if ($val === FALSE) //locale is not available if the $val is returning FALSE for linux distributions run the following command locale-gen fr_FR.utf8 and it should install the locale for you.

Categories : PHP

Date and Time Culture Format based on Country in JavaScript
Have a look at jQuery Globalize. You can include your culture scripts and set your jQuery culture: Globalize.culture('ja'); or Globalize.culture('ja-JP'); some extra infos on dates.

Categories : Javascript

Adding date or time in datetime format to another datetime
*This is a method using DateTime:* $begin = new DateTime($start); $finish = new DateTime($end); $difference = $finish->format('U') - $begin->format('U'); // working version $minutesDiff = round(($difference/60), 0); $finalDate = new DateTime(); $finalDate->modify(sprintf('+%s minutes', $minutesDiff)); edit added missing bracket edit2 version without ->diff() method

Categories : PHP



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