w3hello.com logo
Home PHP C# C++ Android Java Javascript Python IOS SQL HTML Categories
Defining the command line arguments of a linux command in python
format is your friend: import os, sys if len(sys.argv) == 2: os.system("sudo rtcwake -m off -s {}".format(sys.argv[1])) else: print "usage: ..." so the seconds are command line parameters. Or, you can make it interactive: import os secs = raw_input() os.system("sudo rtcwake off -s {}".format(secs)) to verify that the user input is an integer: try: secs = int(secs) except: print 'usage: '

Categories : Python

Basics of Command Line Arguments, Python
You want to use the sys.argv list from the sys module. It lets you access arguments passed in the command line. For example, if your command line input was python myfile.py a b c, sys.argv[0] is myfile.py, sys.argv[1] is a, sys.argv[2] is b, and sys.argv[3] is c. A running example (testcode.py): if __name__ == "__main__": import sys print sys.argv Then, running (in the command line): D:some_path>python testcode.py a b c ['testcode.py', 'a', 'b', 'c']

Categories : Python

How do I run Python script using arguments in windows command line
To execute your program from the command line, you have to call the python interpreter, like this : C:Python27>python hello.py 1 1 If you code resides in another directory, you will have to set the python binary path in your PATH environment variable, to be able to run it, too. You can find detailed instructions here.

Categories : Python

Command line arguments as variable definition in Python
This is a relatively simple task with ast.literal_eval and string splitting -- But only if you have a really well defined syntax. (e.g. only 1 of --foo=bar or --foo bar is allowed). import argparse import ast parser = argparse.ArgumentParser() #allow the creation of known arguments ... namespace,unparsed = parser.parse_known_args() def parse_arg(arg): k,v = arg.split('=',1) try: v = ast.literal_eval(v) #evaluate the string as if it was a python literal except ValueError: #if we fail, then we keep it as a string pass return k.lstrip('-'),v d = dict(parse_arg(arg) for arg in unparsed) print(d) I've put the key-value pairs in a dictionary. If you really want them as global variables, you could do globals().update(d) -- But I would seriously a

Categories : Python

Hadoop mapreduce python command line arguments
You can read the input file from os.environ. For example, import os input_file = os.environ['map_input_file'] Actually, you can also read other JobConf from os.environ. Note: During the execution of a streaming job, the names of the "mapred" parameters are transformed. The dots ( . ) become underscores ( _ ). For example, mapred.job.id becomes mapred_job_id and mapred.jar becomes mapred_jar. To get the values in a streaming job's mapper/reducer use the parameter names with the underscores. See Configured Parameters. I also find a very useful post for you: A Guide to Python Frameworks for Hadoop.

Categories : Python

How can I use python command line arguments that change at run time?
The whole configuration is done at runtime. The examples use string constants for the names, but you are not bound to that. You first load the configuration, then when you have all the elements, simply loop over those and register them as arguments: parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(....) for element in configuration_elements: parser.add_argument('--' + element, type=float, ...) then parse your command line. Alternatively, argparse.ArgumentParser() as a partial parsing mode as well; simply call parser.parse_known_args() to parse everything that argparse does know about, it'll return a namespace object (all the options it could parse) and the remaining arguments it didn't know how to handle: >>> parser = argparse.ArgumentParser() >>> parser.add_argument('--foo')

Categories : Python

Python arguments cuts at < when reading from command line
you need to escape the < sign. try calling: python time.py python ratatosk.py < input.txt it might be better to use a different character than < so that running this command is easier

Categories : Python

Infinite Amount of Command Line Arguments in Python
You don't need to, command line arguments are stored in sys.argv which will give you a list of the command line arguments. You just need to sum over them. from sys import argv print sum(map(int, argv[1:])) # We take a slice from 1: because the 0th argument is the script name. And just do python testScript.py 1 2 3 6 P.S - Command line arguments are stored as strings, so you need to map them to integers to sum over them. *args is used when you need to pass unknown number of values to a function. Consider the following - >>> def testFunc(*args): return sum(args) >>> testFunc(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 21

Categories : Python

How do I make command line arguments with a hyphen (-) show up as non-optional in python v2.7?
Please use the required keyword when adding it to the argparse: http://docs.python.org/2/library/argparse.html#sub-commands parser.add_argument("-b", help='Build number, e.g., 1234', required=True)

Categories : Python

PyQt4 `QCoreApplication.arguments()` returns 'unknown' when I pass non-ASCII command line arguments
The encoding for QApplication is Latin-1, and you need it to be UTF-8. To get around this, you may manually encode the arguments using .encode('utf-8'), before passing them to QApplication.

Categories : Python

looking for best way of giving command line arguments in python, where some params are req for some option and some params are req for other options
This variation on your script runs, and cleans up several things. It uses choices to control the options values. It omits unnecessary parameters in the other add_argument calls. It simplifies the post parse_args logic. help isn't really needed since there is always the -h option, but I included it as a choice. It falls through to the end because it is not in the action dictionary. import argparse import sys class Stub(object): def __init__(self,s): self.s = s def __call__(self,conf_file, jobid): print self.s, conf_file, jobid parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Usage options.') parser.add_argument('-o','--options', choices=('run','rerun','kill', 'resume', 'suspend','help'),required=True) parser.add_argument('-c', '--config',help='config file input') #

Categories : Python

what is Command Line Arguments in C#
The string[] args may contain any number of command line arguments which we want to pass to Main() method. If we were executing the application through command prompt we could see how it would work. For a method as shown static int Main(string[] args) { for(int i = 0; i < args.Length; i++) Console.WriteLine("Arg: {0}", args[i]); Console.ReadLine(); return -1; } For example, you can pass a FileName and access it while the application starts running. Suppose if the application is a text editor we can open the text file like this. The Main method can be declared with or without a string[] parameter that contains command-line arguments. When using Visual Studio to create Windows Forms applications, you can add the parameter manually or else use the Environment class to obt

Categories : C#

Get the arguments from a command line in vb.net
A simple (and clean) way to accomplish this would be to just modify your Sub Main as follows, Sub Main(args As String()) ' CMD Arguments are contained in the args variable Console.WriteLine("GetCommandLineArgs: {0}", String.Join(", ", args)) End Sub

Categories : Vb.Net

How to get command line arguments from VimL?
:help argc() :help argv() :help argidx() And maybe also :help argument-list, just to be sure. Simple example: for arg in argv() echo arg endfor

Categories : Vim

Command line arguments in F# program?
If you don't want to use the args array passed to your main function then you could use System.Environment.GetCommandLineArgs() instead. Note this will include the name of the program being run as the first item, unlike the args array given to your main function. open System [<EntryPoint>] let main(args) = printfn "args: %A" args printfn "env.cmdline: %A" <| Environment.GetCommandLineArgs() 0 Run as args.exe 1 2 3 4: args: [|"1"; "2"; "3"; "4"|] env.cmdline: [|"args.exe"; "1"; "2"; "3"; "4"|]

Categories : Dotnet

Command-line arguments available to other functions?
As DaoWen has said, the command-line arguments are just data, available in main(). So if you don't want to pass a command-line argument as a parameter to another function but you want it available in other functions, you could strcpy()/strncpy() the string into a global string.

Categories : C

Command line assignment in arguments
You can do FROM_FILE=true ./exe and then read the FROM_FILE environment variable from inside the app with the environ pointer or getenv(). See http://linux.die.net/man/7/environ

Categories : C

spider from command line arguments
Assuming I've understand the issue, you want to do a slice on the start_url but you've defined it incorrectly. Put a colon after the 12 in square brackets as per the following, and that will fix the issue: self.fname = '{0}.{1}.{2}'.format(self.start_url[12:], time.time(),'txt') logfname = '{0}.{1}.{2}'.format(self.start_url[12:], time.time(),'log')

Categories : Python

Passing binding or arguments to ERB from the command line
If you are using unix, try following: $ cat 1.erb Hello. My name is <%= name %>. I hope your day is <%= quality %>. $ (echo '<% name="Joe"; quality="fantastic" %>' && cat 1.erb) | erb Hello. My name is Joe. I hope your day is fantastic.

Categories : Ruby

Problems while parsing command line arguments
char * inputFileName = new char ; char * outputFileName = new char ; These two lines allocate space for exactly one character each. strcpy(inputFileName,argv[1]); strcpy(outputFileName,argv[2]); These two lines, copies at least 2 characters (as otherwise it wouldn't count as an argument - an argument can't be "empty"). I would suggest that you use std::string instead of allocating memory. Then you can just do outFilename = argv[2]; and not have to worry about it's size. Alternatively, if you are not going to use the name for anything other than keep it in a name that makes more sense than argv[2], then you could just declare const char *outFilename, and set it with outFilename = argv[2]; - but beware that modifying the contents of argv[2] is not recommended, as you don't know wha

Categories : C++

args.length and command line arguments
int array is initialized to zero (all members will be zero) by default, see 4.12.5. Initial Values of Variables: Each class variable, instance variable, or array component is initialized with a default value when it is created ... For type int, the default value is zero, that is, 0. You're printing the value of the array, hence you're getting 0. Did you try to do this? for(int i = 0;i<args.length;i++) { System.out.print(args[i]); } args contains the command line arguments that are passed to the program. args.length is the length of the arguments. For example if you run: java myJavaProgram first second args.length will be 2 and it'll contain ["first", "second"].

Categories : Java

Retrieving command line arguments in a Qt application
code should be argv[1]... int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { QApplication a(argc, argv); MainWindow w; w.show(); w.setGeometry(QRect(QPoint(100,100), QSize(1000,500))); CHat *hat = new CHat(); hat->color(argv[1]);//"red" ???? --> argv[1] return a.exec(); } this works for the commandLine: ./countHats "red" or ./countHats red

Categories : C++

How to access command line arguments in UEFI?
You need to be careful with this one. As you are probably aware, there is a UEFI LoadedImage protocol - this protocol returns a structure called EFI_LOADED_IMAGE which in turn has a LoadOptions member. The UEFI shell will set this LoadOptions variable to whatever you type on the command line. Alternatively, I believe you can set this through the BootOptions EFI Variable, which is where care is needed - the first "argument" is not the process path in this case. So what you need to do is process the one-long-string you get to deduce the "arguments" as you want them. To use the LoadedImage protocol, do this: EFI_STATUS status = EFI_SUCCESS; EFI_LOADED_IMAGE* loaded_image; EFI_GUID loaded_image_protocol = LOADED_IMAGE_PROTOCOL; status = gBS->HandleProtocol(ImageHandle,

Categories : Misc

Check command line arguments for input value
A switch statement isn't really called for here. That's useful when you have a single value and need to select from a series of possible mutually-exclusive steps based on that value. But that's not what you're doing here. These aren't a chain of if/else if statements keying off a value, these are more like guard clauses. All of them need to run in order to determine all of the output to show to the user. You can shorten the code by removing the curly braces: if (!(programName.Equals("Army"))) Console.WriteLine("Error"); if (!Int32.TryParse(args[1].ToString(), out isNum )) Console.WriteLine("value should be a number"); if (!File.Exists(file1)) Console.WriteLine("file 1 does not exist"); if (!File.Exists(file2)) Console.WriteLine("file 2 does not exist"); You could a

Categories : C#

How to pass command line arguments to a c program
In a Windows environment you just pass them on the command line like so: myProgram.exe arg1 arg2 arg3 argv[1] contain arg1 etc The main function would be the following: int main (int argc, char *argv[])

Categories : C++

Set command line arguments in unit tests in C#
Why not extract the parsing logic to a separate class and unit test that separately from your main ()? The parsing class should receive string parameters. Therefore you can test as many scenarios as you need in different tests without actually having to run the program executable, just calling the class instead. UPDATE: Now, if you don't want to create an extra class (I would probably still do it, just for clarity, but anyhow), take into account that you CAN just call your static Main(string[] args) method from your unit test, passing different parameters to cover different scenarios.

Categories : C#

Error trying to use command line arguments in Java
It is better you take inputs as <temp1> <unit1> <temp2> <unit2>. This way you'll get all the parameter you need in the desired format. You can now parse args[0] and args[2] for tempValues and the other two parameter for the units. Even better, just take <temp1> <temp2> as you command line arguments and decide that <temp1> is in degC and <temp2> is in F.

Categories : Java

Program that is dependent on command line arguments
sys.argv is a list of the arguments, so you want to check to see if the length is equal to one (sys.argv[0] will always be the name of the script): if len(sys.argv) == 1: # no arguments provided

Categories : Python

What is this assembly code doing with the command line arguments
Without letting us know how your function is called and how the called ones are declared, we are not able to actually help you. For Example, it's not clear whether alloca and _main are cdecl, stdcall, fastcall, etc. and how many parameters they expect, you would need to investigate them as well and see how they set up, access and clean up the stack. As for your code, it looks kind of weird.. It calls alloca and _main without cleaning up the stack, so either they aren't cdecl or the "sub esp,8" allocates space for both calls. It then zeros eax and moves it into ebp-4, which could be a parameter to those calls. However, most of the stack is uninitialized. After calling alloca it doesn't do anything with eax, so either _main is some kind of fastcall and expects a parameter in eax or your c

Categories : Linux

c++ command line arguments in ubuntu terminal
You define command line arguments when you first invoke the program. For example, the command cp ~/file.txt ~/folder/ takes the command line arguments "cp", "~/file.txt", and "~/folder/". Do note that the first argument in an array of command line arguments is the name of the program itself.

Categories : C++

Issue with Command Line arguments which got spaces in it
When you pass command line arguments with spaces, they are taken as space separated arguments, and are splitted on space. So, you don't actually have a single argument, but multiple arguments. If you want to pass arguments with spaces, use quotes: java classname "Apple Inc. 2013 Jul 05 395.00 Call"

Categories : Java

How to get command line arguments of an Eclipse 4 application from code
I've got it. It is not so intuitive, but it works for me. There is an instance implementing the IApplicationContext interface. (The interface depends on the org.eclipse.equinox.app.) The instance is reachable by the injection mechanism. The method getArguments() returns a map. But it does not return a map of some command line parameters and their values. It returns some map, where it is under the key "application.args" stored an array. Exampli gratia: @PostConstruct public void createControls(Composite parent, HtmlEditorService editorService, IApplicationContext iac) { System.out.println(iac.getArguments().get("application.args").getClass().getCanonicalName()); ... } Then it prints out java.lang.String[]. However the array contains just my custom arguments instead all arguments.

Categories : Misc

Unable to pass command line arguments in Ruby 2.0.0
Other people had similar problems with Vista and Ruby 1.9 in the past. It seemed to be related to manual modifications or broken uninstalls of old versions. A clean install of "rubyinstaller-2.0.0-p247-x64.exe" on Windows 7 works for me. The assoc and ftype commands do not know about ruby. > assoc .rb File association not found for extension .rb > ftype rbfile File type 'rbfile' not found or no open command associated with it. I'd suggest you unset these values by starting a Shell as Administrator and running ftype rbfile= and assoc .rb=. If this doesn't help (make a backup and) delete all registry keys containing rbfile. The correct keys use RubyFile or RubyWFile. The InnoSetup Script contains the correct registry entries.

Categories : Ruby

How can I use command line arguments with knitr source file?
You could write a R script instead of a bash one: my_script_launcher.R library(knitr) args <- commandArgs(TRUE) if (length(args) < 2) stop("Bad args, usage refdir cmpdir") refdir <- args[1] cmpdir <- args[2] knit2pdf('my_script.Rnw') my_script.Rnw documentclass{article} egin{document} refdir=Sexpr{refdir} cmpdir=Sexpr{cmpdir} end{document} Then you launch it like this: Rscript my_script_launcher.R foo bar

Categories : R

put awk or grep output to command line arguments in bash
In bash, you cannot set positional parameters in a way that the caller can read that value. If you want to 'return' a string from a function, you must write it to stdout, like so: function myfunc() { echo "test" } VAR=$(myfunc) When the above code is run, VAR will contain the string 'test'.

Categories : Bash

parent send command line arguments to child
Code: #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/wait.h> #include <string.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { pid_t pid; int status; int comm[2]; char buffer[BUFSIZ]; // set up pipe if (pipe(comm) < 0) { printf("pipe error "); return -1; } // call fork() if((pid = fork()) <0) { printf("fork error %d ", pid); return -1; } else if (pid == 0) { // -- running in child process -- int nChars = 0; close(comm[1]); //printf("%d ",BUFSIZ); // Receive characters from parent process via pipe // one at a time, and count them. int n; while( (n =r

Categories : C

How do I pass arguments to a PL/SQL script on command line with SQLPLUS?
Firstly, you will need to invoke your script like so: sqlplus.exe MYUSER/mypassword@HOST030 @refreshDataOnOracle.sql foo bar Instead of the OS redirection you will use the "@" symbol to indicate the file name to execute. You will also supply the script parameters on the command line. In the script you will refer to the parameters using &1, &2 etc. update mytable set mycol = '&2' where myid = '&1'; which will translate into update mytable set mycol = 'bar' where myid = 'foo';

Categories : Oracle

Customize container configuration with command line arguments
You can still configure the container in the OnStartup() method, it will cause no problems for you as long as you don't request any of those services from the container either implicitly or explicitly before OnStartup() gets called. Caliburn.Micro doesn't treat the Configure() method in any special way. In fact if you don't provide overrides for the GetInstance(), GetAllInstances() and BuildUp() methods in your bootstrapper Caliburn.Micro won't be able to consume any of the services registered with your container even if you configure it correctly in the Configure() method. Edit: One more thing i wanted to clarifiy. Since you are going to provide additional configuration in the OnStartup() method then you should derive your bootstrapper from BootstrapperBase instead of Bootstrapper<TR

Categories : Dotnet

Command line arguments reading monad library
You can use optparse-applicative. The most common use pattern looks like this (I'm just copy-and-pasting from a small utility I use): options :: Parser (String, String) options = (,) <$> (strOption $ mconcat [ short 'n', long "node", metavar "NODE", value "127.0.0.1", showDefaultWith id, completer (bashCompleter "hostname"), help "AMQP node to connect to" ] ) <*> (strOption $ mconcat [ short 'q', long "queue", metavar "QUEUE", value "1.0.0", showDefaultWith id, help "Queue to initialize" ] ) main = do (hostName, queue) <- execParser $ info (helper <*> options) $ mconcat [ fullDesc, header "The Suns setup utility",

Categories : Haskell

Why is /tmp/go-build644681611/command-line-arguments/_obj/exe passed in to go run
go run will compile (go build) your source into the system TEMP or TMP environment variable, then execute the file from there. It's not really designed for the running of production code, as it obviously takes longer to compile and execute than to just execute. The usual practice is to use go run for development, and then go build and distribute the binaries. go run is really a convenience for the developer to quickly test code in one command. It does have some useful benefits in running portable source code between multiple, disparate systems, but, if you're going to deploy the code to all of these systems, it's usually normal to include the go build in the deployment. Check out the full guide to the Go command To make matters easier, it's quite possible to just cross-compile Go code to

Categories : Go



© Copyright 2017 w3hello.com Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.